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Last month, Lindsey provided readers of the Drug and Device Law blog with an overview of United Health Services, Inc. v. U.S. ex rel. Escobar, a False Claims Act (FCA) case that was bringing the implied certification theory of FCA liability before the U.S. Supreme Court for review. The FCA imposes liability on anyone who knowingly presents, or causes to be presented, false or fraudulent claims (or requests) for payment to the federal government.…
On December 4, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari in Universal Health Services, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar, No. 15-7, to review the so-called “implied certification” theory of liability under the federal False Claims Act (FCA). That theory, which both the federal government and private “relators” have invoked with increasing frequency, finds an FCA violation for those who seek funds from the government while in violation of a legal or contractual obligation—even…
The U.S. Supreme Court recently granted certiorari in Universal Health Services, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar, No. 15-7, to review the “implied certification” theory of liability under the False Claims Act.  In recent years, that theory has been applied in a wide variety of circumstances with increased frequency, exposing defendants to substantial damages and penalties.  Because of this, the Supreme Court’s decision could result in significant changes to the scope of False Claims…
One of the hottest topics in class action litigation is whether a defendant’s offer of judgment providing complete relief to a plaintiff under Rule 68 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure moots the plaintiff’s individual and uncertified class action claims.  In just a few weeks, the U.S. Supreme Court will take up this question in Campbell-Ewald Co. v. Gomez, and the Court could settle broad disagreement among lower courts on the issue. The use…
This post was also written by James C. Martin. In a decision that has significant repercussions both for the pharmaceutical and health care industries and False Claims Act jurisprudence more broadly, the U.S. Supreme Court denied review of a groundbreaking Fourth Circuit decision affirming the dismissal of a novel False Claims Act suit against Reed Smith client Omnicare, Inc. In its February 2014 decision, the Fourth Circuit rejected the qui tam relator’s claim that…
This post was also written by James C. Martin. Recently the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit affirmed the district court’s dismissal of the relator’s False Claims Act (FCA) complaint against Omnicare in United States ex rel. Rostholder v. Omnicare, Inc., a decision having significant repercussions for the pharmaceutical industry and broader FCA jurisprudence. The Fourth Circuit rejected plaintiff’s claim that Omnicare violated the FCA when it sought reimbursement for drugs that it…