Seyfarth Shaw LLP

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Howard is an associate in the Labor and Employment group in Seyfarth Shaw’s New York office. His practice includes the representation of management in employment litigation matters before state and federal courts, at trial and appellate levels, as well as federal and state agencies, including the National Labor Relations Board, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Department of Labor, New York State Division of Human Rights, New Jersey Division on Civil Rights and the New York State Public Employment Relations Board.  In this role, Mr. Wexler has extensive experience defending both single and multi-plaintiff discrimination/harassment cases, class and/or collective actions, as well as lawsuits initiated by the EEOC.  He has represented employers in class and collective actions and multi-plaintiff claims involving discrimination/harassment on the basis of age, race, gender, national origin, and other protected classifications. His wage-and-hour experience includes the defense of major class action claims involving meal breaks, rest breaks, misclassification, and work-off-the-clock allegations.

Latest Articles

By Ashley Laken Seyfarth Synopsis: U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit rules that the NLRB properly found that a hospital violated the NLRA by threatening employees with discipline and arrest for peacefully picketing on hospital property. On August 10, 2018, in Capital Medical Center v. NLRB, No. 16-1369, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit agreed with the NLRB that off-duty employees at a hospital had the right under Section 7…
By:  Jason Silver Seyfarth Synopsis: A mere six weeks after the Supreme Court held that fair share or agency fees for public-sector unions are unconstitutional in Janus v. AFSCME, Pennsylvania introduces a bill that would require public-sector unions to obtain a majority vote of all employees, including non-union employees, to authorize a strike. On August 7, 2018 republican representatives in Pennsylvania introduced and referred to the committee on labor and industry House Bill No. 2586,…
By: Timothy Hoppe Seyfarth Synopsis: Labor friendly states will likely be looking for opportunities to lessen the financial blow of the Supreme Court’s decision in Janus v. AFSCME. The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in Interpipe Contracting v. Becerra just helped give California a head start (although perhaps only a small one).  For many years, California employers subject to the state’s prevailing wage law (employers working on public works projects) could take a credit towards…
  By: Joshua M. Henderson Seyfarth Synopsis:  Just when employers thought they were safe to restrict offensive speech and restore decorum in the workplace, a recent decision by the Board serves as a stark reminder that offensive workplace speech may still find protection under the National Labor Relations Act. In Constellium Rolled Products Ravenswood, LLC, the Board decided that an employee who wrote the words “whore board” on an overtime sign-in sheet was engaged…
By:  Bradford L. Livingston On July 17, 2018, the DOL rescinded its 2016 “persuader rule” — a controversial reinterpretation of the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959 (LMRDA) that would have required employers and their consultants (including lawyers) to report their relationships and the fees paid related to persuading employees “to exercise or not to exercise… the right to organize and bargain collectively… .” The 2016 rule effectively eviscerated the LMRDA’s exemption for reporting advice,…
By: Glenn J. Smith and Jason J. Silver Seyfarth Synopsis: Public-sector labor unions were dealt a heavy, but not unexpected, blow as the Supreme Court of the United States issued a landmark decision in Janus v. AFSCME. By a vote of 5 to 4, the Court held that fair share fees for public-sector unions are unconstitutional.   Whether the actual fallout from the decision will match the level of the pre-decision rhetoric remains to be…
By: Rashal G. Baz Seyfarth Synopsis: On June 20, 2018, Peter B. Robb, General Counsel for the NLRB, directed regional offices to continue aggressively pursue temporary injunctions to stop categories of potentially unfair labor practices In a newly released memorandum, National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) general counsel, Peter B. Robb (“Robb”) urged regional offices to continue to pursue Section 10(j) relief as an “important tool” for effective enforcement of the National Labor Relations Act…
By: Glenn J. Smith and Samuel Sverdlov Seyfarth Synopsis: Given the Ninth Circuit’s recent holding that successor withdrawal liability is governed by a constructive notice standard, private equity companies and other businesses seeking to acquire other enterprises should be hyper-diligent in determining whether the transaction will expose their organizations to withdrawal liability triggered by the seller. Under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (“ERISA”), as amended by the Multiemployer Pension Plan Amendment Act (“MPPAA”), generally,…
  By:  Jason Silver and Kevin Fritz Seyfarth Synopsis: On June 6, 2018, Peter. B. Robb, General Counsel for the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”), provided employers with the first substantive guidance regarding workplace policies since the Board’s Boeing decision. General Counsel Memorandum 18-04 is a victory for employers as the Board seems to be returning to a common sense approach when evaluating workplace policies concerning on the job conduct, confidentiality, defamation, intellectual property, among…
By:  Monica Rodriguez Seyfarth Synopsis: The ALJ found that the employer did not violate the Act where it terminated an employee for using vulgar language during a staff meeting in efforts to undermine the general manager’s managerial authority. Disciplining employees can sometimes be a challenge when attempting to comply with the National Labor Relations Act (the “Act”). Fortunately for the employer, the Administrative Law Judge (the “ALJ”) in Buds Woodfire Oven LLC d/b/a Avas Pizzeria…