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Oxycontin No Longer Covered In light of the major role Oxycontin has played in the opioid crisis faced by Ohio and the rest of the country, the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) has removed the painkiller from its list of approved drugs it will cover for Ohio’s injured workers. Starting in July of this year, no new prescriptions for Oxycontin will be approved and the drug will be replaced by Xtampza ER, another form…
Last week, the Department of Justice issued some revisions to its guidance on enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. This guidance informs employers of what the DOJ looks for when assessing employers’ level of cooperation and compliance with the FCPA. Thus, employers take this guidance very carefully into account when developing their compliance programs. One notable change made by the DOJ was a clarification of employers’ obligations to develop policies on the use of…
Private employers with more than 100 employees previously have been required to report workforce data across 10 job categories broken down by race, gender and ethnicity. The data is reported annually by October 1 to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) on the EEO-1 form, which currently comprises one page for each facility of an employer. In the summer of 2016, during the Obama administration, the EEOC expanded the EEO-1 effective March 31, 2018,…
A Federal District Court in the Western District of North Carolina has dismissed a claim of race discrimination by an African-American Lowe’s employee who was fired after seven months of employment. The Court found that the same person who hired him had made the decision to terminate his employment. This fact, according to the Court, created a strong presumption that the discharge was not motivated by unlawful bias, or the person would not have hired…
Lame duck legislative sessions are often fraught with risk, as legislators who have been defeated or are retiring have a last chance to leave a “legacy” and the others have the maximum time before their next election. Often, more gets done in the lame duck sessions than in any comparable time period during the rest of the General Assembly’s term. In the 2018 post-election session of the General Assembly, the House Leadership controversy created even…
As of January 1, 2019, Connecticut and Hawaii have joined the ranks of California, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Vermont by adopting state-wide bans against salary history inquires. State and local governments across the country are increasingly introducing and passing legislation prohibiting employers from asking candidates their salary history information, with the aim of ending pay inequity.  The purpose behind salary history bans is to prevent employers from relying upon a…
Feel like the government shutdown has reduced news coming out of the federal administrative agencies? If so, January 17, 2019 likely provided a spark to your week. Last Thursday, National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) Chairman John Ring issued a letter which served as the most-recent move in the NLRB’s joint employer dance. In his letter, Chairman Ring responded to the request of two U.S. House of Representatives Democrats that the NLRB withdraw its proposed joint…
Administering payroll for employees with variable work schedules and hourly rates can cause major headaches for employers. In an effort to simplify and reduce administrative costs, employers are oftentimes tempted to set a standard overtime rate to be paid at a set dollar amount to all employees regardless of variations in compensation rates and actual weekly compensation earned. However, as a recent Department of Labor Opinion Letter explains, employers must adhere to the FLSA’s overtime…
Although some departing employees are willing to risk violating their non-competes when they leave a company, a recent court decision reinforced one of the significant dangers that those employees can face in doing so. In this decision, a federal appeals court in Ohio ruled that a former employee who violates a non-compete can be forced to pay the employer’s legal fees, even if the former employer does not prevail on all of the issues raised.…
On September 14, 2018, the National Labor Relations Board published a new proposed rule that attempts to reverse the joint-employer rule created in the Board’s Browning-Ferris Industries decision of 2015. (Browning-Ferris Industries of California, Inc., 362 NLRB No. 186 (2015). On December 10, 2018, the Board issued a notice that it was extending until January 14, 2019, the deadline for submitting comments to the proposed rule, and extending until January 22, 2019, the deadline for…